Planet for Sale


The band name Planet for Sale is itself an allusion to the disposable earth mentality that became standard with pro-growth market cheerleaders, global warming skeptics, polluting corporations, anti-regulation libertarians (including environmental and safety regulations), and space colonists, all of whom advocated for "global bankruptcy," that is, relocating the human biosphere to other planets instead of embracing the environmental stewardship that became normative in future generations.

The band name Planet for Sale is itself an allusion to the disposable earth mentality that became standard with pro-growth market cheerleaders, global warming skeptics, polluting corporations, anti-regulation libertarians (including environmental and safety regulations), and space colonists, all of whom advocated for "global bankruptcy," that is, relocating the human biosphere to other planets instead of embracing the environmental stewardship that became normative in future generations.

Planet for Sale's best known single and LP was called "Hovering Over Trauma," otherwise known as "H.O.T.", which later became the theme song for Billy Sugoi's 2035 award-winning film, Dance of the Celestial Bodies, starring Duran Duran Murasaki, the former darling of Japanese indie cinema now in her 40's.  The film's premise is eerily prophetic:  a series of comets are heading towards Earth, forcing humans to relocate to the Sea of Tranquility on the moon.  "H.O.T.," was not only an obvious allusion to global warming (which was once denied by climate skeptics in the early 2010's until Millenials became the dominant political demographic), but was also an ironic reference to the emotionally complex goodbye that the last human crew said after they'd abandoned earth forever.  The song played just as the final colonists had left the earth's atmosphere and were gliding through space in their shuttles, watching their beautiful, heartbreaking, and lonely planet through their windows one final time.